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The Survival Doctor Store: Essential supplies for your car



 

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For the Car
Essential Medical Supplies for Your Car

 

Welcome to my guide to survival-medicine supplies. Here are the types of supplies I think you should have and why I believe they’re important.

(I get a small percentage of the items you buy via this survival store. I’m not guaranteeing the quality of any of the products. They’re just the type I would pick if I were buying—and often I am.)

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Blankets:
Space and wool (one each per person)

I recommend one space blanket (left) and one wool blanket (right) per person. Use a space blanket under a wool blanket. Space blankets reflect heat back to your body, and wool blankets help conserve heat.

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Hot Packs

These could help keep your whole car warm, or you could use them on your hands and feet. If someone is showing signs of hypothermia, warm packs applied under the arms and the groin area before covering the person with a blanket can help a lot.


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Folding Shovel

A small folding shovel won’t take up much room and will help you dig out of snow or mud.


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Flares

To make sure you’re seen.


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Tire Chains


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Battery-Booster Cables



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Kitty Litter, Nonclumping

To give your tires traction for getting out of ice or snow.


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Thermos

Consider one for packing medicines and other objects you want to keep dry and that don’t do well in temperature extremes. It might help insulate them short-term.

I don’t know which thermos is best, so I didn’t even try to pick one. Your call.

Click here for options from Amazon.
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Food and Water

Keep plenty of water and nonperishable food in your car. Click below for some options.

The Survival Doctor Store: Water and food survival supplies

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From the “Basics” Category

Don’t forget these must-have emergency supplies for your car, also featured in “Basics.”

In addition, make a small first-aid kit out of your basic supplies. Maybe some adhesive bandages, antibacterial ointment, safety pins, scissors, and Kerlix, tape, at minimum. Add more according to your comfort level and expertise.

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Flashlight and/or Headlamp

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Batteries

Keep extras in every size you might need.

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Matches, Lighters, and Candles

Keep matches, lighters, and candles in a sealed, waterproof container, perhaps an empty coffee can.

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Living Ready Pocket Manual: First Aid

This guide, by yours truly, is small enough for the car but in-depth enough to help you survive for hours to days when you can’t get help.

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